Burials FAQ

Do you have to be Ukrainian or Orthodox to be buried in St. Stephen's Cemetery?

The Garden of Tranquility, Nature Trail and Field of Honour are open to everyone and accept casket as well as urn burials.

The Garden of Resurrection and Garden of Eternity are reserved for members of the Orthodox Church and both follow Orthodox traditions with regard to burial.

 

How much do plots / cremation spaces cost and what are my payment options?

Fees vary depending on time and circumstances. Contact the Cemetery Office to discuss your specific needs and to get a quote. Payment can be cash, cheque, VISA, Mastercard and debit. We also offer interest-free financing over a 12-month period.

 

What if circumstances change and I no longer want or require a burial plot?

Plots can be re-assigned to other family members through the Cemetery Office. St. Stephen's will also repurchase a plot at 85% of the original price.  

 

How soon after or long after a death must an individual be buried?

There is no law that states a specific time frame for burial. Considerations that will affect timeline include the need to secure all permits and authorizations, notification of family and friends, preparation of cemetery site and religious considerations. Public health laws may have limitations on the maximum length of time allowed to pass prior to final disposition. Contact your local funeral provider.

 

Does a body have to be embalmed before it is buried?

No, embalming is not required for burial. It is your choice. It may depend on such factors as whether the family has selected a public viewing with an open casket; or to enhance the deceased’s appearance for a private family viewing; public health laws may require embalming if the body is going to be transported by air or rail, or because of the length of time elapsed from the time of death prior to the burial.

 

What are my choices for ground burial?

Most common are single graves and lots composed of two or more graves. Not all types of graves are available. Please check with the Cemetery Office for availability of specific graves.

 

How do I choose the right type of grave?

Because it is an important question, many things must be considered. What type of memorial do you prefer? A marker set flat on the ground? An upright monument? How many burials do you expect to take place? Are you arranging for yourself or your family? How much do you want to spend? Answers to these types of questions will assist you to make the right purchase as graves vary by size, location and by price.

 

What options are available besides ground burial?

Besides ground burial, some cemeteries offer interment in lawn crypts or entombment in mausoleums. In addition, most cemeteries provide choices for those who have selected cremation. These often include placement of cremated remains in a niche of a columbarium or interment in an urn space. Many cemeteries now provide for scattering of the remains in a garden set aside for that purpose, which can include a plaque memorializing the deceased.

 

If I’m going to be cremated, why would I want my remains to be placed in a columbarium or interred or scattered at the cemetery? Why shouldn’t I just have them scattered in the sea or in some other place of my choosing?

As long as it is permitted by local regulations, your cremated remains can be scattered in a place that is meaningful to you. This can, however, present difficulties for your survivors. Some people may find it hard to simply pour the mortal remains of a loved one out onto the ground or into the sea. If you wish to be scattered somewhere, it is therefore important to discuss your wishes ahead of time with the person or persons who will actually have to do the scattering. Another difficulty with scattering can occur when the remains are disposed of in an anonymous, unmarked or public place. Access to the area may be restricted for some reason in the future, undeveloped land may be developed or any of a host of other conditions may arise that could make it difficult for your survivors to visit the site to remember you. Even if your cremated remains are scattered in your backyard, what happens if your survivors relocate sometime in the future? Once scattered, cremated remains cannot easily be collected back up. Having your remains placed, interred or scattered on a cemetery’s grounds ensures that future generations will have a place to go to remember. If remains are scattered somewhere outside the cemetery, many cemeteries will allow you to place a memorial of some type on the cemetery grounds, so survivors have a place to visit that will always be maintained and preserved.

 

What is a columbarium?

A columbarium, often free-standing in a cemetery or located within a mausoleum or chapel, either indoor or outdoor, is constructed of numerous small compartments (niches) designed to hold urns containing cremated remains.

 

What are burial vaults and grave liners?

These are the outside containers into which the casket is placed. Burial vaults are designed to protect the casket and may be made of a variety or combination of materials including concrete, stainless steel, galvanized steel, copper, bronze, plastic or fiberglass. A grave liner is a lightweight version of a vault which simply keeps the grave surface from sinking in.

 

Must I purchase a burial vault?

Most large, active cemeteries have regulations that require the use of a basic grave liner for maintenance and safety purposes. Either a grave liner or a burial vault will satisfy these requirements. Some smaller rural or churchyard cemeteries do not require use of a container to surround the casket in the grave.

 

What is double depth?

Some cemeteries either allow for the burial of two caskets in a grave or have specific sections where this type of grave is available. Double depth just means that one casket is placed in the grave at an approximate depth of seven feet. When a second interment is required, the second casket is placed on top of the first casket at standard depth.

 

What is disinterment? What is the process, and why does it happen?

Disinterment is the removal of the casket containing human remains from a grave. Disinterment may be ordered by certain public officials without the consent of the grave owner or the next of kin, for example, as part of a police investigation. Individuals or families may also request disinterment, if for example they would like to have the human remains relocated to another grave in the cemetery, to a mausoleum or possibly shipped to a country of birth. Disinterment requires the grave to be opened. The casket containing the human remains is removed. Depending on the length of time the casket has been buried, a new casket may be required. The grave is then closed. Disinterment can also refer to the removal of cremated remains from a grave.

 

St. Stephen's Cemetery

 

20303 - Meridian St. N.E.
Edmonton, AB  T5Y 6E6

 

Phone: 780-377-0277

 

Business Hours:

 

On site office open

Monday to Saturday

10:00 am to 4:00 pm

 

Cemetery Hours:

 

Gates are open from

dawn to dusk everyday

 

Directions:

 

195 Avenue closed until Oct. 2017

Click on Directions for alternate access routes.